Posted on / by / in Advertising, Branding, Digital Marketing, Promotion

Branding Checklist – The Ultimate Guide: Part 2

Your customer’s experience

After you have had the chance to take inventory of all the places your branding shows up – it’s time to review and audit what needs to be updated or created to reflect your current brand platform and identity standards.

First prioritize the starting line for your customer and use their next steps as a map into figuring out what comes next.

For example, if you are selling a product in stores and participating in trade shows, the package design, in store POS (point of sale) promotional signage, and trade show elements would be the first things your customer see. From there, maybe the buyer receives a sell sheet, showcasing your products and information associated with it.

With visual story telling, information hierarchy, and distinctive product packaging that stands out on the shelf – the customer then may buy your product.

The overall customer experience touches on various points of your branding, thus leaving that lasting impression or purchase. Having a road map that will show you which scenarios your customer might take next. You’ll want to know their path so that whatever direction they take – you be sure there are no loose ends of where your brand shows up.

 

Make it all come together

So by now you’ve established all the places your branding exists and you know where and how your potential customer is engaging with your brand. It is now time to make sure all the elements of your brand platform have a consistent and cohesive look and feel. Take a look at our case study on Painting Hamilton – their brand went from DiRago Painting to Painting Hamilton, and we cohesively made the connection across their brand platform to touch on different areas their brand lives including their logo, typography, colour, marketing materials, and web presence.

We may be biased but our recommendation is to hire a graphic designer. Ideally the person or team who helped you create and establish your branding from the beginning, to help you implement your brand’s platform across the board, wherever your brand shows up.

If it’s the person who initially created your brand – you can trust them to make choices on a whim when it comes to how your brand is applied across different facets. If you’re working with a freelance design, you may need to give them more direction until they are comfortable and familiar with the look and feel of your brand.

When working with a graphic designer, the more you can batch your projects together, the more seamless and efficient you can be with your budget and timelines. This means you’ll need to be more organized with your marketing strategy and efforts.

You might be inclined to tackle branding yourself – but we have seen far too many people butcher their beautiful brand by trying to become a graphic designer. It might be a little bit of an investment to hire help, but we promise it will save you money in the long run.